Tag Archives: research

More evidence for positive outcomes for chiropractic treatment of lumbar disc herniations

Lumbar disc herniation and chiropractic adjustments

This study adds to the preponderance of evidence that chiropractic care is both a.) viable and effective as an initial option for conservative treatment of lumbar disc herniations, and b.) safe. Now, I’m not selling chiropractic as a magic bullet, one hit wonder, walk in the park, sure-fire quick fix for disc herniations. I try to give my patients realistic expectations and goals. The discs between your vertebrae do not heal quickly. They, like other ligamentous tissue, do not have a great blood supply, therefore they heal predictably slower than other tissues of the body. Thus recovery is inherently not as quick as most people would like. It is not realistic to expect a few adjustments to reduce a bulging disc or put a bone back into place and for all to be well again. Recovery is a process that involves multiple aspects, such as:

1. Education: Spine-sparing strategies are taught in order to avoid movements and positions that create more strain on the injured disc(s). This aspect of treatment is extremely important. When you have a herniated disc and a pinched nerve, there are some stretches that feel good in the short term, but in the long term are inhibiting the healing process. The first step is to educate to remove any barriers to a successful outcome.

2. Passive care: Passive care includes any external interventions, or those that don’t involve any effort on your part. This includes chiropractic adjustments (only one tool in our bag), joint mobilizations, traction, electrotherapy, low level laser, and kinesiotaping. Passive therapies are effective (as shown in the study above), but have their limitations and are not always as powerful as #1 and/or #3.

3. Active care: This includes anything that requires effort on your part, which is basically any of the stretches and exercises that you will be taught to perform in the office and at home to complement the passive portion of your treatment. This can make or break your recovery from lumbar disc herniation. No matter what condition we see in the office, the patients who see the best results and are happiest with the outcome of their treatment are those who are the most involved in their care and the most consistent with active care.