Category Archives: Videos

Chiropractic care for hikers with heel pain

We’re continuing our theme this month on hiking injuries. In the last video I talked about what can cause knee pain in hikers and how we treat it. Today I’m going to talk about another common hiking injury – heel pain. Heel pain is a very common complaint in both hikers and runners. A very common diagnosis for heel pain in hikers is Plantar Fasciitis, or inflammation of the connective tissue that supports the arch of your foot.

The plantar fascia attaches to the inside part of your heel, and that’s why this can be one cause of your heel pain. The problem is that not all heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis. If you’re a hiker with heel pain, you may have tried or at least read online about several different methods of self treatment for heel pain – lacrosse balls, golf balls, heat, ice, kinesiotape, orthotic inserts, or special braces that stretch your foot while you sleep. If plantar fasciitis is not the cause of your heel pain, then perhaps none of those things will work. That is why it’s so important to see your healthcare provider for a proper examination and diagnosis, and your exam needs to include what we call the kinetic chain, or all the joints and tissues upstream from your foot. Your heel pain can be caused by anything from Achilles tendinitis, nerve entrapment at the ankle, peripheral neuropathy, stress fracture, or even a disc injury in your lower back.

Once we’ve gone through a thorough evaluation of a patient with heel pain, there are typically 3 areas we tend to focus on: The lower back, the ankle, and the foot.

If the lower back seems to be contributing to your heel pain, we have several different approaches to help with that. In the office, I can perform chiropractic adjustments as well as use a special table to apply traction to decompress your lower back and relieve pressure on irritated joints and nerve roots that can refer pain to your foot. I will also get you doing some stretches to relieve irritation on the same areas.

In the ankle and lower leg we typically see stiff joints, tight muscles and nerve irritation that contribute to heel pain and a potential diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. For that, we can do some adjusting and mobilization at the ankle, some neuromobilizations to help free up the nerves crossing through there, and deep tissue massage and stretching to loosen up tight muscles.

At the foot, we can also employ chiropractic adjustments, deep tissue massage to the plantar fascia, taping, orthotics, and strengthening exercises to improve the stability of the intrinsic muscles in your foot and reduce strain on the plantar fascia.

In the video above, I demonstrate a couple of mobility drills for the ankle and a strengthening exercise that, in addition to what we offer here at the clinic, can help you beat your heel pain and get back out on the trail.

Treatment for knee pain when hiking downhill


 

 

Hi this is Dr. Kip Thompson with Catalyst Chiropractic and Rehabilitation, your chiropractor in Beaverton, OR. We have a lot of hikers here in Portland. One of the most common complaints I hear from our hiker patients is knee pain when hiking downhill. The reason for that is when you are walking downhill you have 3-4 times more force on your legs than when walking on an even surface. We take 2 approaches to combat knee pain when hiking downhill: First, reduce the amount of load going through the joint. Second, make yourself more resilient by increasing your capacity to bear the loads placed on the legs when hiking downhill (strengthen your legs). 

There are three ways to reduce load while walking downhill. The first way is to just slow down. As you can imagine, the faster you are traveling, the more impact you will have on your legs and knees as you are stepping downhill. The second way to reduce knee pain while hiking downhill is to bend your hips and knees more. The straighter your legs are and the more upright you are, the greater the impact on your joints, particularly the knees. Putting a slight bend in the hips and knees as you are walking downhill helps your muscles absorb more of the shock, taking stress off the knee joint. Lastly, you can use a hiking stick or trekking poles. These tools have been shown to reduce impact on your lower extremities by up to 25% while hiking, and that is why they’re important, especially for hikers with knee pain while going downhill.

Here are some examples of things we’ve done with some of our patients suffering from knee pain to help them become more strong and stable in the knees. Again, these are just examples of exercise techniques. To find out what is right for your situation, we would need to perform a thorough examination and come up with an individualized treatment and recovery plan. On your first visit at Catalyst Chiropractic and Rehabilitation, one of the first things I look at is your ability to stand on one leg while keeping your hips level and not losing balance. It’s surprising how often we find someone who can’t stand on one foot for longer than 10 seconds, yet never even realized they have a balance problem. If you are not able to adequately stabilize your hips while standing on one foot, this can translate into abnormal stress on your knees and result in knee pain. What I could have you do is practice one leg stands. Stand on one foot for as long as you can without losing balance or letting your pelvis tilt to one side. The goal is to be able to do that for 60 seconds. If you can’t do it, you could work up to it by performing 3 reps on each side for as long as you can before losing control. Then repeat that daily to gradually improve stability and balance.

The second exercise I’d like to demo is called quad sets. This exercise is commonly used early in knee rehabilitation to strengthen the quadriceps muscles and add stability to the knee. Lie flat on your back and rest a pillow or rolled up towel under your knee. Then contract your quads, which will straighten your knee and push downward into the pillow. Hold this for 10 seconds at a time, performing multiple repetitions of 10 seconds each.

Ultimately you will need to progress to more functional movements that mimic what you will actually encounter on the trail. A more progressive way to strengthen your quads is to start doing some squats. We mimic the downhill motion by elevating the heels by placing an object underneath your heels. From there, slowly lower into a squat position, then quickly return to standing posture. I like to use the cadence of 2 counts going down and 1 count coming up to emphasize that lowering motion that happens with every step while hiking downhill.

One last, more difficult progression is a 1 leg decline squat. This is set up the same was as the two leg decline squat that I just demoed, but it is performed with only one leg in the lowering phase of the exercise. Then use both legs to come back to starting position. The lowering portion of this exercise is called an eccentric muscle contraction of the quadriceps. Eccentric strengthening exercises are great for rehabbing tendon injuries, which is much of the time part of the cause with knee pain in hikers.

For any questions or to set an appointment to see me, call 503-526-8782 or visit our website at catalystchiroandrehab.com

Why sneezes cause back pain

I remember several years ago I was watching Sports Center and the anchor reported that Sammy Sosa was not going to play that day due to back pain caused by a sneeze. It was reported in a way that made light of the subject, and I even got a good chuckle out of it. You may have laughed as well if this had never happened to you, but whether they make the headlines or not, sneezes often result in back or neck pain. As a chiropractor, I see this frequently and my patients are often embarrassed when they tell me how it happened. I believe sneezing is risky for two reasons:

1. When you sneeze you often turn your head in order to aim it away from people near you and to cover it with your arm or hand. Sneezing causes a very violent contraction of the diaphragm and many of the muscles that support the neck and spine. When creating such a violent contraction with your neck twisted, it is easy to see how a muscle could be pulled or even a joint in the spine sprained as the tissues are put under such intense stress.

2. Sneezing causes a rapid rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The pressure builds as all the air taken in during the “ahh” part of the sneeze gets restricted momentarily before the “choo” part. Raising intra-abdominal pressure also causes an increase in intra-thecal pressure, or the pressure inside the spinal canal, as well as the pressure inside the intervertebral discs, the soft cushions between each of your vertebrae. A sudden spike in pressure in these areas can cause a disc injury and/or a pinched nerve sensation in the back or neck.

One way to avoid injury when sneezing is to reduce the stress on your spine by slightly extending your neck and your lower back. As I discuss in the video below, we tend to bend forward when we cough or sneeze. Bending forward can place more pressure on the spine even when not sneezing, so it is best to avoid that position then next time you feel a tickle in your nose. See the video for more details. Until next time, take care and sneeze safely 🙂

-Dr. Thompson

 

Introducing our Back to Basics series

 

This is the first in a series of videos that we will be posting to introduce you to some simple spine-sparing strategies. These are designed to be used by those who are recovering from back pain, neck pain, headaches, or other ailments. In reality, though, these are basic skills to be used to form a foundation for a healthy spine and pain-free living.

The first step in the recovery process and one of my first goals when I first meet with a patient is to identify what is causing the pain. Sometimes it is a traumatic injury, other times it is due to repetitive stress, but no matter what the cause, your body needs the best chance it can get to heal correctly. In order to facilitate that, you need to learn which movements and positions to avoid  and which ones to adopt to take stress off of injured joints and tissues. I like using this explanation: Pretend your back injury has a scab, and try to avoid “picking” at that scab so that it can heal as quickly as possible. To avoid picking the scab, it is important to be able to learn how to maintain a “neutral” spinal alignment as you perform certain movements during your daily activities. As you well know if you have thrown your back out, even the simplest of movements can be extremely challenging .

The first basic movement covered in this video is getting into and out of a chair. This is perhaps the most common complaint I get from people with low back pain – that it hurts when getting up out of a chair. To make this movement less threatening, it is important to “preserve the curve.” In other words, don’t lose track of that little backwards curve in the small of your back. If you let it flatten out or flex it forward, that’s when you get into trouble. As the video shows, scoot forward to the edge of your seat, and stand straight up when getting out of the chair, and reverse the process when sitting down.

Stay tuned for more basic spine care tips from Dr. Kip Thompson at Catalyst Chiropractic and Rehabilitation. If you are reading this because you are in pain, don’t hesitate to contact us to schedule your first assessment with Dr. Thompson.

Improve Your Posture

 

For today’s Spine Hack, I want to show you a simple way to improve your posture. Posture can be overcomplicated; it’s something we tend to sometimes over-think.  But, by using a simple verbal cue, we can make it really easy and natural.

What I like to use is the phrase, “Sit Tall.” When sitting, reach your head towards the ceiling, which engages the deeper stabilizing muscles around your spine, as well as some of your core. This helps you sit up taller, aligns your spine, and takes pressure off of your joints and muscles, allowing you to feel better.

For more information about back pain and neck pain treatments in Beaverton Oregon, talk with me directly at (503) 526-8782. That’s today’s Spine Hack- until next time, Sit Tall!

Spine Hacks: How to beat “Text Neck”

Chances are, you are reading this blog from either your phone or your tablet. If not then likely your laptop. Stop for a second and think about where your device is in relation to your eye level. You are looking down, aren’t you? Now think about how often you use these devices and you will realize that you spend a considerable amount of time with your head down and neck flexed forward. Do you ever feel muscle tension in your upper shoulders or pain in your neck? Do you get tension headaches? This one piece of advice will go a long way toward helping with those problems: Bring your screen up to eye level. Gravity is hard enough to fight in good posture. Don’t make it harder than it should be.

How To Lift A Child Correctly


Welcome to Spine Hacks. Today’s segment is about how to lift your child correctly. I’ll show you two ways to safely lift your kid. Children are so much closer to the floor than we are that we must bend a lot throughout the daily course of activities to take care of them. Therefore, we are going to talk about how to do that safely, as to prevent back injuries.

In the video above, I use a stick and a 20lb kettle bell for demonstration. When we are bending, the goal is to keep our spine in a neutral alignment, as demonstrated with the stick in the video. The stick should maintain contact with your head, midback, and sacrum as you bend. If it comes off of your back , you know that your form is not correct. Most of us will choose to bend the quick and easy way, which can have negative consequences if done repeatedly.

In the next section of the video,using a kettle bell,  I demonstrate how to bend to pick up your child, as well as an alternative by using a lunge. Both actions are much safer on your spine when compared to the traditional way that many of us will pick up our kids.

I hope you enjoyed today’s Spine Hack about how to lift your child correctly. For more information about how we can help you through Beaverton chiropractic care, contact our office today at (503) 526-8782.