Ask Dr. T – Neck Pain

Now for a little segment I like to call, Ask Dr. T. Today’s question is this: “Hey Doc, I have this pain in my neck. I think it’s just a tight muscle, but I’m not sure. What do you think?”

I hear this question a lot, and my answer is that it’s rarely just a tight muscle. You cannot affect a vertebra without affecting a muscle and vice versa. So which came first? Hard to say, but a good bet is that it’s the bone’s fault.
Neck pain is one of the most common conditions I see in the clinic, and the cause is overwhelmingly due to vertebral malpositions that put undue stress on the joints of the neck and the soft tissues that support it.
3 Common causes of malpositions in the neck:
  1. Poor posture: Prolonged sitting leads to slouched posture, straightening the natural curve in your neck that is meant to absorb shock.
  2. Whiplash: The whipping motion of the neck during a motor vehicle collision (even at low speeds) forces the vertebrae out of proper alignment.
  3. Degenerative conditions: Arthritis, stenosis, and degenerative disc disease are all due to long term stress on your cervical (neck) vertebrae and are related to abnormal vertebral alignment.
What to do about it:
Don’t just sit there (literally). The simplest thing you can do is avoid sitting for prolonged periods of time. Take mini breaks at least once per hour. This can be as simple as standing to stretch and breath deeply for 30 seconds. If your neck pain lasts longer than a few days, is severe, or if it radiates into your arms, give us a call to schedule your appointment ASAP.
Yours in health
-Dr. Thompson

November 2013 Newsletter

Catalyst Chiropractic November Newsletter
In This Issue
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Pain in the neck?
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November 2013
Two of the most hectic months of the year are upon us. It seems no matter how hard some of us try to make the holidays stress-free, they somehow always end up becoming stress-full. We encourage you to find the way and the time to take care of yourself this season and not let the stress get the best of you. And remember – for any chiropractic care in Beaverton OR -we are always here if you need us!
-Team Catalyst

Annual Food Drive Now Through December 16th

Help us hit our goal of 500 lbs. of food for the Oregon Food Bank, and you could win a Kindle Fire HD!
For every 5 non-perishable food items you donate, you will receive 1 contest entry
The winner will be announced at the end of the day on December 16th, so hurry and bring in your goods!

Holiday Schedule Changes
Thanksgiving schedule:
Open Mon-Wed 11/25-27
Closed Thurs-Fri 11/28-11/29

Christmas schedule:

Closed Mon-Thurs 12/23-12/26
Open Fri-Sat 12/27-12/28

Ask Dr. T
“Hey Doc, I have this pain in my neck. I think it’s just a tight muscle, but I’m not sure. What do you think?”

I hear this question a lot, and my answer is that it’s rarely just a tight muscle. You cannot affect a vertebra without affecting a muscle and vice versa. So which came first? Hard to say, but a good bet is that it’s the bone’s fault.
Neck pain is one of the most common conditions I see in the clinic, and the cause is overwhelmingly due to vertebral malpositions that put undue stress on the joints of the neck and the soft tissues that support it.
3 Common causes of malpositions in the neck:
  1. Poor posture: Prolonged sitting leads to slouched posture, straightening the natural curve in your neck that is meant to absorb shock.
  2. Whiplash: The whipping motion of the neck during a motor vehicle collision (even at low speeds) forces the vertebrae out of proper alignment.
  3. Degenerative conditions: Arthritis, stenosis, and degenerative disc disease are all due to long term stress on your cervical (neck) vertebrae and are related to abnormal vertebral alignment.
What to do about it:
Don’t just sit there (literally). The simplest thing you can do is avoid sitting for prolonged periods of time. Take mini breaks at least once per hour. This can be as simple as standing to stretch and breath deeply for 30 seconds. If your neck pain lasts longer than a few days, is severe, or if it radiates into your arms, give us a call to schedule your appointment ASAP.
Yours in health
-Dr. Thompson